Seven Concepts on Leadership

Seven Concepts on Leadership

By Israel Galindo, Associate Dean for Lifelong Learning

The concept of leadership has seen its own evolution. What constitutes a leader and leadership in fields of study and in various contexts have changed over the decades. Over the years some concepts have proven more helpful, and more accurate, than others. But I think the fundamental reality of what constitutes effective leadership has always been the same. Having said that, we must confess the caveat with that sentence is in how one defines effective leadership. If leadership is about getting the job done, then that’s one thing. If leadership is about promoting integrity and health, then it’s another.

I remain intrigued about how people think about leadership. And it is interesting to see how they struggle when presented with a different way of thinking about it. At a recent presentation about leadership the program participants carried on a lively debate about leadership and power. The majority equated one with the other: to be a leader is to have power; or, to be a leader is to be a person of power. But power is a concept misapplied in relation to leadership. Strictly speaking, power is energy times time (as my engineer son will tell you). In reality, leadership is more about relational influence than it is about power. Effective leaders understand the difference, and, act accordingly.

Here are five fundamental concepts about leadership that challenge how we commonly think about leadership. For many, the shift in their paradigmatic thinking is so huge that the first step is to struggle at reconciling the disconnect with what they currently believe.

To learn more about leadership from these perspectives, here is a list of resources to consider.

Here are additional opportunities at the Center for Lifelong Learning to learn more about leadership:

Israel Galindo is Associate Dean for Lifelong Learning at the Columbia Theological Seminary. Formerly, he was Dean at the Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond. He is the author of the bestseller, The Hidden Lives of Congregations (Alban), Perspectives on Congregational Leadership (Educational Consultants), and A Family Genogram Workbook (Educational Consultants), with Elaine Boomer and Don Reagan.

His books on Christian education include Mastering the Art of Instruction; The Craft of Christian Teaching (Judson), How to be the Best Christian Study Group Leader (Judson), Planning for Christian Education Formation (Chalice), and A Christian Educator’s Book of Lists.
Galindo contributes to the Wabash Center’s blog for theological school deans and to the Digital Flipchart blog.

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